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One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus

A bond for life: University of Canberra student Sarah Hazell had her right hand re-attached by Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh in what he believes was the procedure of his career. Photo: Karleen Minney.University of Canberra student Sarah Hazell was heading home to Moruya for Christmas a year ago when her car veered off the Kings Highway just south of Bungendore and rolled several times.
Nanjing Night Net

Her right hand was all-but severed, “hanging on by a tiny tendon”, according to the Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Ross Farhadieh.

It was December 6. Thoughts of many were turning to Christmas and winding down for the holidays. Mr Farhadieh’s too. He had family in town. That Sunday afternoon he’d told his mum that he expected things to be quiet. They were off to see the latest James Bond movie.

He parked his car. And then his mobile rang with news of Sarah’s accident.

There is an obvious rapport between Canberra plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh and his young patient Sarah Hazell who today can use her re-attached right hand to write, drive, swim, eat with. Photo: Karleen Minney.

The movie was ditched and Mr Farhadieh was in another theatre altogether by Sunday evening for what turned out to be epic 14-hour surgery in which he painstakingly re-attached Sarah’s hand.

One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus and concentration that stretched well into Monday morning, as Mr Farhadieh performed what he believes could be the surgery of his life, mending bones, tendons, nerves, arteries, veins.

“It was effectively a hand transplant,” he said.

“I don’t expect to see another one for the remainder of my career.”

Within two weeks of the surgery, Sarah, who is right-handed, was writing Christmas cards with the re-attached hand. A year later, she is back at uni, determined to live her life to the full.

Mr Farhadieh believes the world-standard microsurgery services at the Canberra Hospital saved Sarah’s hand, but so too did her own quiet determination to not give in and to continue with intensive rehabilitation.

“There are some people who are just very good at dealing with adversity,” he said.

“And just because you look at them from the outside and they look very fragile or gentle, it doesn’t mean they don’t have that iron core. And she’s definitely one of those people.”

A year later, 21-year-old Sarah is close to tears as she speaks about what her doctors mean to her.

“Oh, I don’t even have words,” she said. “Just so grateful.”

A series of things worked in Sarah’s favour on the day of the accident, which was likely the result of fatigue. The first was that an off-duty paramedic was among the first on the scene and helped to get her quickly to hospital by the Snowy Hydro SouthCare helicopter.

Four hours is the critical threshold for a severed limb to be without a blood supply before the muscles start to die. So the hand had to be reattached in Canberra. Mr Farhadieh had blood pumping again to the hand a little over four hours after Sarah’s accident.

“It was literally on the cusp so as soon as I saw her hand pink-up, I was like, ‘Yes!’,” he said.

But the drama did not end there.

There was a push from some to have Sarah transferred to Sydney because it was closer and she could go by helicopter.

Mr Farhadieh was adamant she be flown by fixed-wing aircraft to Melbourne to be in the care of Professor Wayne Morrison at St Vincent’s Hospital, the man who led the surgical team that performed Australia’s first hand transplant in 2011.

Not only that, Professor Morrison was a mentor to Mr Farhadieh, having trained him during this medical studies.

It would take longer to transport Sarah to Melbourne, but Mr Farhadieh believed it was worth it.

“Really, you want the most experienced people around you to fix this and the guy who did the hand transplant is the world’s foremost authority, right?” he said.

Sarah was back in surgery in Melbourne by the Monday evening, the day after her accident. Professor Morrison focused on grafting skin and fat from her thigh on to her damaged arm.

There were three operations in Melbourne and within two weeks, Sarah was home in Moruya, recovering with parents Terry and Annette, with the support of siblings Amy and Nathan.

Mr Farhadieh said for all the trauma experienced by Sarah, everything that could go right, did go right.

“Sarah’s outcome has been a spectacular Christmas miracle for all of us,” he said.

“Her sensation and motor function has returned and she has a highly-functional hand again.”

Apart from everything else, her experience is another reminder to be safe on the roads during the holiday season.

On the day of the accident, Sarah had finished her part-time job and was feeling tired. She still believed she was well enough to drive almost three hours to Moruya. Witnesses say her car simply drifted off to the side of the road.

“I thought I was fine,” she said.

“I’d just say to people, ‘Take a break, drive with someone’. Or don’t drive at all if you’re tired.”

She remembers little of the accident other than waking up and being told she was in a hospital in Melbourne. She had no other injuries except a graze on her leg. How the hand was actually cut remains a mystery.

Accepting the injury took some time.

“I don’t think I looked at my arm for a couple of months,” she said.

“You slowly take time. I mean I’ve got a lot of people around me who are great.”

At the time of the accident, Sarah was studying to be a primary school teacher. She has since switched to public health, planning to become perhaps an occupational therapist or psychologist.

The accident played a part in diverting her life path.

“I think I always had a passion [for health] but this probably pushed me more to change and do it,” she said.

Mr Farhadieh, meanwhile, is a migrant who moved to Australia from Iran with his family when he was 13. Among his many achievements is writing a plastic surgery textbooknow studied around the world. He says after “being the beneficiary of the brilliant education in this country”, he wanted to work in the public health system and help people like Sarah.

“If you don’t give back, what’s the point?” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

US intelligence report: Vladimir Putin directed cyber campaign to help elect Donald Trump

US intelligence agencies believe Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered “an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the US presidential election”, according to an unclassified report released on Friday.
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The goals were “to undermine public faith in the US democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency,” the report by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence concludes.

“We further assess Putin and the Russian Government developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump.”

The report combines conclusions from investigations of the FBI, the CIA and the NSA.

“We have high confidence in these judgments,” the report notes.

The analysis states that the campaign to influence the US election outcome was multifaceted and one of the boldest yet by Russia.

It represented “a significant escalation in directness, level of activity, and scope of effort compared to previous operations aimed at US elections.”

Without mentioning the name of former NSA-contractor turned leaker Edward Snowden, the report makes an oblique reference to the effects of the disclosures have had on the reputation and legitimacy of the US government.

“We assess the 2016 influence campaign reflected the Kremlin’s recognition of the worldwide effects that mass disclosures of US Government and other private data—such as those conducted by WikiLeaks and others—have achieved in recent years, and their understanding of the value of orchestrating such disclosures to maximise the impact of compromising information.”

The release of the unclassified report comes one day after the role of Russia’s role in the election of Donald Trump was the subject of a Senate hearing, an event in which senior Republicans urged a tough line on Russia over efforts to sway US political outcomes.

Trump has repeatedly faced – and dismissed – questions about his relationship with Russia and Vladimir Putin. During his last press conference, Trump mockingly asked Russia to hack Hillary Clinton’s emails.

On Friday Trump continued to try to downplay accusations that he colluded with a foreign power to support his campaign for the White House. He dismissed concerns about the effect of Russia’s hacking of the Democrats emails and subsequent dissemination of the emails as a political “witch hunt.” He also said Russian hacking had no influence on the outcome of the 2016 election.

Trump has made better relations a rare point of consistency in a campaign that has wilfully lied to and confused the American public as an apparent part of a media strategy to gain support from voters.

Trump has used Twitter to criticise the conclusions of US intelligence agencies, an unprecedented behaviour from an incoming American president.

Republicans, who maintained their majority in Congress on the coat tails of Trump’s win, are left in an awkward position by the role Russia played in the election. In recent months, President Barack Obama has been criticised for not taking the threat of Russia seriously.

Now that Republicans are in power, with a Republican soon in the White House, the GOP will be responsible for investigating Russian influence operations. Moreover, Trump’s frequent denials suggest he has nothing to lose by a thorough investigation.

Even before the US election, Russian influence and social media operations were well known through Europe.

“Russia, like its Soviet predecessor, has a history of conducting covert influence campaigns focused on US presidential elections,” the report states, warning that the success of Russia in 2016 will likely embolden it.

“We assess Moscow will apply lessons learned from its Putin-ordered campaign aimed at the US presidential election to future influence efforts worldwide, including against US allies and their election processes.”

Germany, for example, going into elections this year, has sounded increasing concern about the effect of social media-empowered misinformation on its politics.

Fairfax Media

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Lifesaver camp educates

Cries for help could be heard from a secluded area of the Ulverstone beach on Saturday but they were not as serious as they sounded.
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Day six of the week longLife SavingDevelopmentCamp involved a boating accident scenario, actors painted in fake blood laid on the beach awaiting camp-goers to come to their aid.

Surf Life Saving Tasmania Life Saving Development Camp coordinator Chris Jacobson said this was one of many real life based scenarios endured at the camp.

“It all starts off as soon as they come in, they do a bit of an introduction and then we hit them straight away with a scenario, they are very much caught off guard,” Mr Jacobson said.

“Through the week we do lots of training and incorporate scenarios to make it seem real life, we start off with just a minor scenario, as the week goes on and their skill level increases we will start throwing some more complex situations at them.”

SURVIVAL: Camp attendees act out a scenario with Tori Crisp who pretended to be in an accident.

Young Tasmanians aged between 16 and 25 can be involved in the lifesaving camps,training and education during the week which prepares participantsto handle larger based scenarios.

“It has just been amazing to see their skill knowledge just increase,” Mr Jacobson said.

Throughout the week participants take turns acting in different roles such as a patrol captain, a radio communicator and more hands on assisting roles.

“The whole idea of the camp is to provide them with the knowledge and skill to be able to adapt to their workplace environment and to provide them with that opportunity.” MrJacobson said.

Team leader for the Life Saving Development Camp Nick Wood said he took part in the first Tasmanian camp in 2014, the skills he learnt were invaluable.

CPR: Tori Crisp gets comforted by Lillie McPherson during the Life Saving Australia camp. Pictures: Cordell Richardson.

“You dotraininginclass rooms and they say this might happen but you come to this camp and you are given a taste of what you actually might be faced with,” he said.

“It gave me much more in depthlearning and real life application, coming away from it I felt confident to be able to deal with situations.”

After just a few months of his successful completion of the camp, Mr Wood said he was faced with a situation which we was able to handle.

“A couple of months after doing the camp one of my neighbours hurt themselves quite seriously –without the development camp I would have had no idea what to do, I would have frozen up.”

TRAINING: Young lifesavers were able to put their skills to use as one of the actors required a spinal board.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus

A bond for life: University of Canberra student Sarah Hazell had her right hand re-attached by Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh in what he believes was the procedure of his career. Photo: Karleen Minney.UNIVERSITY of Canberra student Sarah Hazell was heading home to Moruya for Christmas a year ago when her car veered off the Kings Highway just south of Bungendore and rolled several times.
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Her right hand was all-but severed, “hanging on by a tiny tendon”, according to the Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Ross Farhadieh.

It was December 6. Thoughts of many were turning to Christmas and winding down for the holidays. Mr Farhadieh’s too. He had family in town. That Sunday afternoon he’d told his mum that he expected things to be quiet. They were off to see the latest James Bond movie.

He parked his car. And then his mobile rang with news of Sarah’s accident.

There is an obvious rapport between Canberra plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh and his young patient Sarah Hazell who today can use her re-attached right hand to write, drive, swim, eat with. Photo: Karleen Minney.

The movie was ditched and Mr Farhadieh was in another theatre altogether by Sunday evening for what turned out to be epic 14-hour surgery in which he painstakingly re-attached Sarah’s hand.

One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus and concentration that stretched well into Monday morning, as Mr Farhadieh performed what he believes could be the surgery of his life, mending bones, tendons, nerves, arteries, veins.

“It was effectively a hand transplant,” he said.

“I don’t expect to see another one for the remainder of my career.”

Within two weeks of the surgery, Sarah, who is right-handed, was writing Christmas cards with the re-attached hand. A year later, she is back at uni, determined to live her life to the full.

Mr Farhadieh believes the world-standard microsurgery services at the Canberra Hospital saved Sarah’s hand, but so too did her own quiet determination to not give in and to continue with intensive rehabilitation.

“There are some people who are just very good at dealing with adversity,” he said.

“And just because you look at them from the outside and they look very fragile or gentle, it doesn’t mean they don’t have that iron core. And she’s definitely one of those people.”

A year later, 21-year-old Sarah is close to tears as she speaks about what her doctors mean to her.

“Oh, I don’t even have words,” she said. “Just so grateful.”

A series of things worked in Sarah’s favour on the day of the accident, which was likely the result of fatigue. The first was that an off-duty paramedic was among the first on the scene and helped to get her quickly to hospital by the Snowy Hydro SouthCare helicopter.

Four hours is the critical threshold for a severed limb to be without a blood supply before the muscles start to die. So the hand had to be reattached in Canberra. Mr Farhadieh had blood pumping again to the hand a little over four hours after Sarah’s accident.

“It was literally on the cusp so as soon as I saw her hand pink-up, I was like, ‘Yes!’,” he said.

But the drama did not end there.

There was a push from some to have Sarah transferred to Sydney because it was closer and she could go by helicopter.

Mr Farhadieh was adamant she be flown by fixed-wing aircraft to Melbourne to be in the care of Professor Wayne Morrison at St Vincent’s Hospital, the man who led the surgical team that performed Australia’s first hand transplant in 2011.

Not only that, Professor Morrison was a mentor to Mr Farhadieh, having trained him during this medical studies.

It would take longer to transport Sarah to Melbourne, but Mr Farhadieh believed it was worth it.

“Really, you want the most experienced people around you to fix this and the guy who did the hand transplant is the world’s foremost authority, right?” he said.

Sarah was back in surgery in Melbourne by the Monday evening, the day after her accident. Professor Morrison focused on grafting skin and fat from her thigh on to her damaged arm.

There were three operations in Melbourne and within two weeks, Sarah was home in Moruya, recovering with parents Terry and Annette, with the support of siblings Amy and Nathan.

Mr Farhadieh said for all the trauma experienced by Sarah, everything that could go right, did go right.

“Sarah’s outcome has been a spectacular Christmas miracle for all of us,” he said.

“Her sensation and motor function has returned and she has a highly-functional hand again.”

Apart from everything else, her experience is another reminder to be safe on the roads during the holiday season.

On the day of the accident, Sarah had finished her part-time job and was feeling tired. She still believed she was well enough to drive almost three hours to Moruya. Witnesses say her car simply drifted off to the side of the road.

“I thought I was fine,” she said.

“I’d just say to people, ‘Take a break, drive with someone’. Or don’t drive at all if you’re tired.”

She remembers little of the accident other than waking up and being told she was in a hospital in Melbourne. She had no other injuries except a graze on her leg. How the hand was actually cut remains a mystery.

Accepting the injury took some time.

“I don’t think I looked at my arm for a couple of months,” she said.

“You slowly take time. I mean I’ve got a lot of people around me who are great.”

At the time of the accident, Sarah was studying to be a primary school teacher. She has since switched to public health, planning to become perhaps an occupational therapist or psychologist.

The accident played a part in diverting her life path.

“I think I always had a passion [for health] but this probably pushed me more to change and do it,” she said.

Mr Farhadieh, meanwhile, is a migrant who moved to Australia from Iran with his family when he was 13. Among his many achievements is writing a plastic surgery textbooknow studied around the world. He says after “being the beneficiary of the brilliant education in this country”, he wanted to work in the public health system and help people like Sarah.

“If you don’t give back, what’s the point?” he said.

Illawarra Mercury

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Nicole Kidman leads Aussie charge at Golden Globes 2017 with 10th nomination

Nicole Kidman, winner of the international star award for Lion, and presenter Dev Patel backstage at the 28th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala on January 2. Both are nominated for Golden Globes for their work in the film. Photo: Jordan Strauss A newly clean shaven Mel Gibson on Jimmy Kimmel Live ahead of the awards. He says winning the best director award for Braveheart was a “big thrill”. Photo: Randy Holmes
Nanjing Night Net

Joel Edgerton is a first-time Golden Globe nominee, Mel Gibson is on a comeback tour with a best director nod for the Australian-produced Hacksaw Ridge, and Nicole Kidman has racked up her 10th Golden Globe nomination for the Australian-produced drama Lion.

But what they all share is national pride. “Wow, it’s fantastic,” Gibson says, referring to the three individual nominations as well as nominees for best drama, Hacksaw Ridge (and its lead Andrew Garfield) and Lion (and supporting actor Dev Patel). “Australia is truly a global player in the film world now and it’s exciting to see the Aussies are so well represented.”

Gibson and Kidman have a long history with the Golden Globe awards, given out for the past 74 years by a small group of foreign journalists based in Hollywood and long viewed as an important box to check on the way to the Academy Awards.

Says Kidman, “The first time I went to the Golden Globes, I was nominated for Billy Bathgate [1991 drama starring Dustin Hoffman] and I couldn’t believe anyone even knew who I was, so to get nominated was just stunning to me.” Times have changed for the movie star, whose date that year was her new husband, Tom Cruise. Tomorrow she’ll be bringing her Aussie husband of 10 years, Keith Urban, and host Jimmy Fallon has asked her to participate in the show’s pre-taped opening skit alongside Ryan Reynolds, Justin Timberlake and Tina Fey. “The Golden Globes is already the most fun awards show of them all and Jimmy will really tap into that vibe,” she says.

Gibson vaguely remembers appearing as a presenter on the Golden Globes “when I was a young actor 30 or 40 years ago” but will never forget the “big thrill” he felt on  winning his 1995 best director Golden Globe for Braveheart. “It’s always a good excuse to sit down, eat a rubber chicken and have a rubberneck at all the other famous people around,” he says. “You get to meet people you’ve admired for a long time. Last time I met Sly and Clint Eastwood so it’s kind of a cool, fun thing to do.” He was also famously skewered by past host Ricky Gervais on two memorable occasions but is confident he’s safe this year. “I’ve been told Jimmy is pretty harmless,” Gibson says. “I remember after the last experience with Ricky, I wanted to strangle him. I saw him later and he said, ‘We were great’ and I said, ‘Yeah right, now move on!'”

Edgerton has no idea what to expect as the new kid on the carpet, adding, “I’ve never been before but it feels exciting to be recognised in this category because they are all actors I admire greatly.”

If the three Aussies continue making the rounds during the long awards season leading up to the Oscars on February 26, they will be spending a lot of time together. Kidman says, “I think any time you are nominated with fellow Australians and you start to see them all the time at these things, you feel like you get closer and closer.”

Gibson is also looking forward to some bonding. “I know Joel, I’ve hung out with him a little bit but I’ve known Nic only peripherally and said hello to her one time so it’ll be fun if we share a few more bad meals together!”

Fairfax Media’s Golden Globes blog is live from Monday at 11am.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Mickey Edwards, the unknown cult hero of the SCG

Third Test, as it happened and scorecard
Nanjing Night Net

Australian sports fans may have found their newest cult hero after a little known fast bowler from Manly-Warringah Cricket Club came onto the field at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the third Test against Pakistan on Saturday afternoon.

The Channel Nine commentary team were struggling to work out who the substitute fielder was as he was greeted with a rousing reaction from the crowd when fielding his first ball.

Mickey Edwards was a sight to see at 198cm with flowing gold locks leaking under his baggy green – a sight not lost on a day five crowd looking for some fun.

It was a fielding stint to remember for the fringe Sydney Sixers bowler, who received a standing ovation before the same crowd booed his replacement – an unusual experience, no doubt, for number one bat David Warner. Meanwhile, what about the reception for sub fielder Mickey Edwards! Get around him! #AUSvPAKpic.twitter南京夜网/zVC9aKZ876— cricket南京夜网419论坛 (@CricketAus) January 7, 2017

The local was soon trending on Twitter as his photo, the crowd reaction and calls for his return to the field were all widely shared, while his home club celebrated the 22-year-old’s new found fame.

The excitement represented a seating upgrade from his spot at the Boxing Day Test last week, and a change in outfit too. SCG fans absolutely loving the work from Mickey Edwards in the field here #AUSvPAKpic.twitter南京夜网/avH52qRdE5— cricket南京夜网419论坛 (@CricketAus) January 7, 2017The wiggles do Boxing Day #ohwhatafeelingpic.twitter南京夜网/JgYlrcWLU2— Mickey Edwards (@mickey_edwards) December 26, 2016Away from Twitter for 15mins & all hell breaks loose. Our boy @mickey_edwards releasing all kinds of love as @CricketAus subfielder pic.twitter南京夜网/vL9BCSOo5D— Manly Cricket (@MWDCC) January 7, 2017This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Footscray restaurant’s windows smashed twice in one week as residents fear ‘class war’

Sixteen window panels were smashed at 8-Bit over the New Year’s Eve weekend. The burger restaurant has been targeted again. Photo: Jason SouthFootscray burger restaurant 8bit has been targeted by vandals for the second time in a week.
Nanjing Night Net

Over the New Year’s weekend, the burger and shakes venue had its windows smashed. The words “F— off hipster scum” were also scrawled across the front door.

During the early hours of Saturday morning, the Droop Street store was targeted again.

A Victoria Police spokeswoman said the restaurant was targeted by a man and a woman about 2am.

“A number of windows and doors were smashed with a rock,” she said.

“Police quickly responded, however the pair had fled.”

8bit co-owner Shayne McCallum said he believed the same man and woman were responsible for both attacks.

He said six windows including the glass automatic door were damaged in the latest vandalism.

“We’ll just get some roller shutters and hopefully prevent them from doing anymore damage,” Mr McCallum said.

“We just boarded it up and traded as usual today.

“On the flipside, everyone’s really good, like the community’s been really good.

“They’re like texting me or people I don’t even know doing Facebook messenger and saying ‘we visited the area, we love it, we’re coming for lunch just to support’ and ‘hopefully it will pay for the windows’, some other people wrote.”

8bit is not the only relatively new establishment to be targeted in the rapidly gentrifying suburb of Footscray in recent weeks.

A bag of meat was thrown through the front door of Rudimentary cafe last month, while other bars and restaurants have reported vandalism.

Susan Cram, a resident of Melbourne’s inner west for five years, says locals are worried the vandalism represents a “hidden class war”.

“After the AFL grand final last year the community was so together,” she said.

“For this sort of violence to be happening, this discontent to be brewing and manifesting itself after that wonderful time, is a bit scary. Who’s next?”

Anyone with further information about the vandalism is being urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
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Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Leave them in cars and pay the price

The state government has reminded people to look after their pets in hot weather. Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with fines up to $77,730 or two years’ imprisonment. Picture: iSTOCKAGRICULTURE Minister Jaala Pulford has reminded petowners that leaving their animals inside hot cars is a criminal offence and could see them imprisoned orfined more than $70,000.
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Ms Pulford said on Saturday it was owners’ responsibility to care for their animals, especially as summer temperatures soar.

“Whether you have herds of cattle, a few riding horses or a couple of cats, it is incumbent upon you to look after your animals’ welfare, especially in hot weather by providing plenty of water, feed and shade,” she said.

The state government has made changes to animal welfare laws, allowing officers from Agriculture Victoria, the RSPCA and Victoria Police to issue notices to anyone who commits a cruelty offence.

Previously, inspectors could only issue a notice to an animal’s owner.

Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with finesup to $77,730 or two years’imprisonment.

Premier Daniel Andrews’ office released a press release that explained Victoria Police should be contacted whenever an animal is left inside a hot vehicle.

Police are permitted to break into a vehicle to rescue the suffering animal.

Other hot weather advice to animal owners includes:

Not handlingor transportinglivestock during extreme heat. If this is unavoidable, people should plan ahead to avoid handling or transporting their livestock during the hottest times of day, and must schedule access to water and frequent, shady rest stops.Feeding heat-stressed horseselectrolytes and cooling them downby hosing them with cool wateror placing wet towels over them.Exercisingpets in the cool of the day. Do notwalk dogs on hot paths or roads, either.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.