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One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus

A bond for life: University of Canberra student Sarah Hazell had her right hand re-attached by Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh in what he believes was the procedure of his career. Photo: Karleen Minney.University of Canberra student Sarah Hazell was heading home to Moruya for Christmas a year ago when her car veered off the Kings Highway just south of Bungendore and rolled several times.
Nanjing Night Net

Her right hand was all-but severed, “hanging on by a tiny tendon”, according to the Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Ross Farhadieh.

It was December 6. Thoughts of many were turning to Christmas and winding down for the holidays. Mr Farhadieh’s too. He had family in town. That Sunday afternoon he’d told his mum that he expected things to be quiet. They were off to see the latest James Bond movie.

He parked his car. And then his mobile rang with news of Sarah’s accident.

There is an obvious rapport between Canberra plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh and his young patient Sarah Hazell who today can use her re-attached right hand to write, drive, swim, eat with. Photo: Karleen Minney.

The movie was ditched and Mr Farhadieh was in another theatre altogether by Sunday evening for what turned out to be epic 14-hour surgery in which he painstakingly re-attached Sarah’s hand.

One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus and concentration that stretched well into Monday morning, as Mr Farhadieh performed what he believes could be the surgery of his life, mending bones, tendons, nerves, arteries, veins.

“It was effectively a hand transplant,” he said.

“I don’t expect to see another one for the remainder of my career.”

Within two weeks of the surgery, Sarah, who is right-handed, was writing Christmas cards with the re-attached hand. A year later, she is back at uni, determined to live her life to the full.

Mr Farhadieh believes the world-standard microsurgery services at the Canberra Hospital saved Sarah’s hand, but so too did her own quiet determination to not give in and to continue with intensive rehabilitation.

“There are some people who are just very good at dealing with adversity,” he said.

“And just because you look at them from the outside and they look very fragile or gentle, it doesn’t mean they don’t have that iron core. And she’s definitely one of those people.”

A year later, 21-year-old Sarah is close to tears as she speaks about what her doctors mean to her.

“Oh, I don’t even have words,” she said. “Just so grateful.”

A series of things worked in Sarah’s favour on the day of the accident, which was likely the result of fatigue. The first was that an off-duty paramedic was among the first on the scene and helped to get her quickly to hospital by the Snowy Hydro SouthCare helicopter.

Four hours is the critical threshold for a severed limb to be without a blood supply before the muscles start to die. So the hand had to be reattached in Canberra. Mr Farhadieh had blood pumping again to the hand a little over four hours after Sarah’s accident.

“It was literally on the cusp so as soon as I saw her hand pink-up, I was like, ‘Yes!’,” he said.

But the drama did not end there.

There was a push from some to have Sarah transferred to Sydney because it was closer and she could go by helicopter.

Mr Farhadieh was adamant she be flown by fixed-wing aircraft to Melbourne to be in the care of Professor Wayne Morrison at St Vincent’s Hospital, the man who led the surgical team that performed Australia’s first hand transplant in 2011.

Not only that, Professor Morrison was a mentor to Mr Farhadieh, having trained him during this medical studies.

It would take longer to transport Sarah to Melbourne, but Mr Farhadieh believed it was worth it.

“Really, you want the most experienced people around you to fix this and the guy who did the hand transplant is the world’s foremost authority, right?” he said.

Sarah was back in surgery in Melbourne by the Monday evening, the day after her accident. Professor Morrison focused on grafting skin and fat from her thigh on to her damaged arm.

There were three operations in Melbourne and within two weeks, Sarah was home in Moruya, recovering with parents Terry and Annette, with the support of siblings Amy and Nathan.

Mr Farhadieh said for all the trauma experienced by Sarah, everything that could go right, did go right.

“Sarah’s outcome has been a spectacular Christmas miracle for all of us,” he said.

“Her sensation and motor function has returned and she has a highly-functional hand again.”

Apart from everything else, her experience is another reminder to be safe on the roads during the holiday season.

On the day of the accident, Sarah had finished her part-time job and was feeling tired. She still believed she was well enough to drive almost three hours to Moruya. Witnesses say her car simply drifted off to the side of the road.

“I thought I was fine,” she said.

“I’d just say to people, ‘Take a break, drive with someone’. Or don’t drive at all if you’re tired.”

She remembers little of the accident other than waking up and being told she was in a hospital in Melbourne. She had no other injuries except a graze on her leg. How the hand was actually cut remains a mystery.

Accepting the injury took some time.

“I don’t think I looked at my arm for a couple of months,” she said.

“You slowly take time. I mean I’ve got a lot of people around me who are great.”

At the time of the accident, Sarah was studying to be a primary school teacher. She has since switched to public health, planning to become perhaps an occupational therapist or psychologist.

The accident played a part in diverting her life path.

“I think I always had a passion [for health] but this probably pushed me more to change and do it,” she said.

Mr Farhadieh, meanwhile, is a migrant who moved to Australia from Iran with his family when he was 13. Among his many achievements is writing a plastic surgery textbooknow studied around the world. He says after “being the beneficiary of the brilliant education in this country”, he wanted to work in the public health system and help people like Sarah.

“If you don’t give back, what’s the point?” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

US intelligence report: Vladimir Putin directed cyber campaign to help elect Donald Trump

US intelligence agencies believe Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered “an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the US presidential election”, according to an unclassified report released on Friday.
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The goals were “to undermine public faith in the US democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency,” the report by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence concludes.

“We further assess Putin and the Russian Government developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump.”

The report combines conclusions from investigations of the FBI, the CIA and the NSA.

“We have high confidence in these judgments,” the report notes.

The analysis states that the campaign to influence the US election outcome was multifaceted and one of the boldest yet by Russia.

It represented “a significant escalation in directness, level of activity, and scope of effort compared to previous operations aimed at US elections.”

Without mentioning the name of former NSA-contractor turned leaker Edward Snowden, the report makes an oblique reference to the effects of the disclosures have had on the reputation and legitimacy of the US government.

“We assess the 2016 influence campaign reflected the Kremlin’s recognition of the worldwide effects that mass disclosures of US Government and other private data—such as those conducted by WikiLeaks and others—have achieved in recent years, and their understanding of the value of orchestrating such disclosures to maximise the impact of compromising information.”

The release of the unclassified report comes one day after the role of Russia’s role in the election of Donald Trump was the subject of a Senate hearing, an event in which senior Republicans urged a tough line on Russia over efforts to sway US political outcomes.

Trump has repeatedly faced – and dismissed – questions about his relationship with Russia and Vladimir Putin. During his last press conference, Trump mockingly asked Russia to hack Hillary Clinton’s emails.

On Friday Trump continued to try to downplay accusations that he colluded with a foreign power to support his campaign for the White House. He dismissed concerns about the effect of Russia’s hacking of the Democrats emails and subsequent dissemination of the emails as a political “witch hunt.” He also said Russian hacking had no influence on the outcome of the 2016 election.

Trump has made better relations a rare point of consistency in a campaign that has wilfully lied to and confused the American public as an apparent part of a media strategy to gain support from voters.

Trump has used Twitter to criticise the conclusions of US intelligence agencies, an unprecedented behaviour from an incoming American president.

Republicans, who maintained their majority in Congress on the coat tails of Trump’s win, are left in an awkward position by the role Russia played in the election. In recent months, President Barack Obama has been criticised for not taking the threat of Russia seriously.

Now that Republicans are in power, with a Republican soon in the White House, the GOP will be responsible for investigating Russian influence operations. Moreover, Trump’s frequent denials suggest he has nothing to lose by a thorough investigation.

Even before the US election, Russian influence and social media operations were well known through Europe.

“Russia, like its Soviet predecessor, has a history of conducting covert influence campaigns focused on US presidential elections,” the report states, warning that the success of Russia in 2016 will likely embolden it.

“We assess Moscow will apply lessons learned from its Putin-ordered campaign aimed at the US presidential election to future influence efforts worldwide, including against US allies and their election processes.”

Germany, for example, going into elections this year, has sounded increasing concern about the effect of social media-empowered misinformation on its politics.

Fairfax Media

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Lifesaver camp educates

Cries for help could be heard from a secluded area of the Ulverstone beach on Saturday but they were not as serious as they sounded.
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Day six of the week longLife SavingDevelopmentCamp involved a boating accident scenario, actors painted in fake blood laid on the beach awaiting camp-goers to come to their aid.

Surf Life Saving Tasmania Life Saving Development Camp coordinator Chris Jacobson said this was one of many real life based scenarios endured at the camp.

“It all starts off as soon as they come in, they do a bit of an introduction and then we hit them straight away with a scenario, they are very much caught off guard,” Mr Jacobson said.

“Through the week we do lots of training and incorporate scenarios to make it seem real life, we start off with just a minor scenario, as the week goes on and their skill level increases we will start throwing some more complex situations at them.”

SURVIVAL: Camp attendees act out a scenario with Tori Crisp who pretended to be in an accident.

Young Tasmanians aged between 16 and 25 can be involved in the lifesaving camps,training and education during the week which prepares participantsto handle larger based scenarios.

“It has just been amazing to see their skill knowledge just increase,” Mr Jacobson said.

Throughout the week participants take turns acting in different roles such as a patrol captain, a radio communicator and more hands on assisting roles.

“The whole idea of the camp is to provide them with the knowledge and skill to be able to adapt to their workplace environment and to provide them with that opportunity.” MrJacobson said.

Team leader for the Life Saving Development Camp Nick Wood said he took part in the first Tasmanian camp in 2014, the skills he learnt were invaluable.

CPR: Tori Crisp gets comforted by Lillie McPherson during the Life Saving Australia camp. Pictures: Cordell Richardson.

“You dotraininginclass rooms and they say this might happen but you come to this camp and you are given a taste of what you actually might be faced with,” he said.

“It gave me much more in depthlearning and real life application, coming away from it I felt confident to be able to deal with situations.”

After just a few months of his successful completion of the camp, Mr Wood said he was faced with a situation which we was able to handle.

“A couple of months after doing the camp one of my neighbours hurt themselves quite seriously –without the development camp I would have had no idea what to do, I would have frozen up.”

TRAINING: Young lifesavers were able to put their skills to use as one of the actors required a spinal board.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Footscray restaurant’s windows smashed twice in one week as residents fear ‘class war’

Sixteen window panels were smashed at 8-Bit over the New Year’s Eve weekend. The burger restaurant has been targeted again. Photo: Jason SouthFootscray burger restaurant 8bit has been targeted by vandals for the second time in a week.
Nanjing Night Net

Over the New Year’s weekend, the burger and shakes venue had its windows smashed. The words “F— off hipster scum” were also scrawled across the front door.

During the early hours of Saturday morning, the Droop Street store was targeted again.

A Victoria Police spokeswoman said the restaurant was targeted by a man and a woman about 2am.

“A number of windows and doors were smashed with a rock,” she said.

“Police quickly responded, however the pair had fled.”

8bit co-owner Shayne McCallum said he believed the same man and woman were responsible for both attacks.

He said six windows including the glass automatic door were damaged in the latest vandalism.

“We’ll just get some roller shutters and hopefully prevent them from doing anymore damage,” Mr McCallum said.

“We just boarded it up and traded as usual today.

“On the flipside, everyone’s really good, like the community’s been really good.

“They’re like texting me or people I don’t even know doing Facebook messenger and saying ‘we visited the area, we love it, we’re coming for lunch just to support’ and ‘hopefully it will pay for the windows’, some other people wrote.”

8bit is not the only relatively new establishment to be targeted in the rapidly gentrifying suburb of Footscray in recent weeks.

A bag of meat was thrown through the front door of Rudimentary cafe last month, while other bars and restaurants have reported vandalism.

Susan Cram, a resident of Melbourne’s inner west for five years, says locals are worried the vandalism represents a “hidden class war”.

“After the AFL grand final last year the community was so together,” she said.

“For this sort of violence to be happening, this discontent to be brewing and manifesting itself after that wonderful time, is a bit scary. Who’s next?”

Anyone with further information about the vandalism is being urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
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Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Leave them in cars and pay the price

The state government has reminded people to look after their pets in hot weather. Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with fines up to $77,730 or two years’ imprisonment. Picture: iSTOCKAGRICULTURE Minister Jaala Pulford has reminded petowners that leaving their animals inside hot cars is a criminal offence and could see them imprisoned orfined more than $70,000.
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Ms Pulford said on Saturday it was owners’ responsibility to care for their animals, especially as summer temperatures soar.

“Whether you have herds of cattle, a few riding horses or a couple of cats, it is incumbent upon you to look after your animals’ welfare, especially in hot weather by providing plenty of water, feed and shade,” she said.

The state government has made changes to animal welfare laws, allowing officers from Agriculture Victoria, the RSPCA and Victoria Police to issue notices to anyone who commits a cruelty offence.

Previously, inspectors could only issue a notice to an animal’s owner.

Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with finesup to $77,730 or two years’imprisonment.

Premier Daniel Andrews’ office released a press release that explained Victoria Police should be contacted whenever an animal is left inside a hot vehicle.

Police are permitted to break into a vehicle to rescue the suffering animal.

Other hot weather advice to animal owners includes:

Not handlingor transportinglivestock during extreme heat. If this is unavoidable, people should plan ahead to avoid handling or transporting their livestock during the hottest times of day, and must schedule access to water and frequent, shady rest stops.Feeding heat-stressed horseselectrolytes and cooling them downby hosing them with cool wateror placing wet towels over them.Exercisingpets in the cool of the day. Do notwalk dogs on hot paths or roads, either.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Leave them in cars and pay the price

The state government has reminded people to look after their pets in hot weather. Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with fines up to $77,730 or two years’ imprisonment. Picture: iSTOCKAGRICULTURE Minister Jaala Pulford has reminded petowners that leaving their animals inside hot cars is a criminal offence and could see them imprisoned orfined more than $70,000.
Nanjing Night Net

Ms Pulford said on Saturday it was owners’ responsibility to care for their animals, especially as summer temperatures soar.

“Whether you have herds of cattle, a few riding horses or a couple of cats, it is incumbent upon you to look after your animals’ welfare, especially in hot weather by providing plenty of water, feed and shade,” she said.

The state government has made changes to animal welfare laws, allowing officers from Agriculture Victoria, the RSPCA and Victoria Police to issue notices to anyone who commits a cruelty offence.

Previously, inspectors could only issue a notice to an animal’s owner.

Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with finesup to $77,730 or two years’imprisonment.

Premier Daniel Andrews’ office released a press release that explained Victoria Police should be contacted whenever an animal is left inside a hot vehicle.

Police are permitted to break into a vehicle to rescue the suffering animal.

Other hot weather advice to animal owners includes:

Not handlingor transportinglivestock during extreme heat. If this is unavoidable, people should plan ahead to avoid handling or transporting their livestock during the hottest times of day, and must schedule access to water and frequent, shady rest stops.Feeding heat-stressed horseselectrolytes and cooling them downby hosing them with cool wateror placing wet towels over them.Exercisingpets in the cool of the day. Do notwalk dogs on hot paths or roads, either.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
Nanjing Night Net

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Crack in the Antarctic ice shelf just grew by 17kms. A break could be imminent

A crack in the Larsen C ice shelf as photographed November 10 2016. Photo: John Sonntag/NASAAn enormous rift in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves grew dramatically over the past month, and a massive chunk more than twice the size of the ACT could break away as soon as later this summer, British scientistsreportedthis week.
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If this happens, it could accelerate a further breakup of the ice shelf, essentially removing a massive cork of ice that keeps some of Antarctica’s glaciers from flowing into the ocean.

The long term result, scientists project, could be to noticeably raise global sea levels by 10 centimetres, or almost four inches.

The current location of the rift on Larsen C, as of January 2017. Labels highlight significant jumps. Tip positions are derived from Landsat (USGS) and Sentinel-1 InSAR (ESA) data. Background image blends BEDMAP2 Elevation (BAS) with MODIS MOA2009 Image mosaic (NSIDC). Other data from SCAR ADD and OSM. Photo: Supplied

It’s the latest sign of major ice loss in the fast warming Antarctic Peninsula, which has already seen the breakup of two other shelves in the same region, events that have been widely attributedto climate change.

Scientists confirm that warm ocean water is melting the biggest glacier in East Antarctica

The crack in the ice shelf, known as Larsen C, has been growing at an accelerating rate. Since the beginning of December, it has grown about 17 kilometresin length, after extending 21 kilometresearlier in the year.

The Larsen C rift on November 10, 2016. Photo: NASA, John Sonntag

In total, the rift has grown about 80 kilometressince 2011 (it’s almost 160 kilometreslong in total), and has widened to well over 300 metres. Now, only 19 kilometresof ice continue to connect the chunk with the rest of the ice shelf.

When it breaks away, the loss would be of nearly 5200square kilometresof ice,saythe researchers with Project MIDAS, a British government-funded collaboration based at Swansea and Aberystwyth universities in Wales. That’smore than twice as big as the Australian Capital Territory.

The consequences of the break could be dramatic.

“When it calves, the Larsen C Ice Shelf will lose more than 10 per centof its area to leave the ice front at its most retreated position ever recorded; this event will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula,” said the researchers in astatementabout the rift.

“We have previously shown that the new configuration will be less stable than it was prior to the rift, and that Larsen C may eventually follow the example of its neighbour Larsen B, which disintegrated in 2002 following a similar rift-induced calving event.”

Here’s an image showing the apparently accelerating advance of the rift, per the Project Midas team:

The British Antarctic Survey alsoreleased a statementon the growing rift, saying a huge iceberg is “set to calve” from Larsen C.

“Because of the uncertainty surrounding the stability of the Larsen C ice shelf, we chose not to camp on the ice this season,” David Vaughan, the survey’s director of science, said in the statement.

The floating ice shelf is fed by the flow of ice glaciers that sit above sea level on the Antarctic Peninsula. As the shelf loses mass, these glaciers could flow more quickly — which would contribute to rising sea levels. Losses from the ice shelf alone, however dramatic, would not have that effect, as the shelf is already floating on water, just like an ice cube in a glass of water.

Fortunately, the Antarctic Peninsula does not contain nearly as much ice as other, thicker parts of Antarctica, such as the West and East Antarctic ice sheets. The potential sea level rise if Larsen C is lost would be measured in centimetres, not feet.

Still, it would subtract a major, enduring feature from the planet, and add to already dramatic changes that have been seen in the Antarctic Peninsula, the portion of the icy continent that extends northward towards South America.

Two smaller ice shelves near Larsen C – Larsen A, and Larsen B – have already largely disintegrated. Larsen B retains a remnant of its former size, but scientists have determined that this ice, too, could vanish before too long. They have also documented that following the collapse of much of the Larsen B ice shelf in 2002, the glaciers behind it sped up their flow towards the sea. Now, the fear is the same process could be unleashed on the larger Larsen C shelf.

The Larsen C ice shelf is more than 300 metres thick, and in spatial extent, nearly the size of Scotland. It is thefourth-largest ice shelf in Antarctica, although nothing compared with the two largest, the Ross and Filchner-Ronneice shelves.

NASA,during a flight in November, captured several spectacular photos of the rift, including the one at the top of this article and also the close-up below. But that was before further extension of the rift last month:

The Antarctic continent is ringed with ice shelves, which are the ocean-front portions of larger glaciers. But as the climate changes, these features have been thinning and in some cases breaking apart dramatically.

The Project MIDAS group did not immediately make a statement attributing the development at Larsen C to climate change, but the fact that the shelf would be “at its most retreated position ever recorded” after the break is certainly suggestive.

Previous researchhas also documented that the Larsen C ice shelf is becoming less thick, and so floating lower in the water, and this appears tied to the warming of the Antarctic Peninsula in recent decades. Warmer seas could also be playing a role.

Now, the wait for the anticipated break begins.

Swansea University’s Adrian Luckman, who heads up Project MIDAS,toldthe BBC that “If it doesn’t go in the next few months, I’ll be amazed.”

Daniela Jansen, a researcher with the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany who collaborates with the Project MIDAS team, largely agreed in an email toThe Washington Post.

“I think the iceberg will calve soon,” she said. “The jumps of the rift tip occurred in shorter time intervals the longer the rift got. This is probably due to the longer ‘lever’ for the forces acting to advance the rift, such as the up and down of the tides or strong winds towards the sea. Whether it will be months or maybe next year, I don’t know.”

The Washington Post

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Leave them in cars and pay the price

The state government has reminded people to look after their pets in hot weather. Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with fines up to $77,730 or two years’ imprisonment. Picture: iSTOCKAGRICULTURE Minister Jaala Pulford has reminded petowners that leaving their animals inside hot cars is a criminal offence and could see them imprisoned orfined more than $70,000.
Nanjing Night Net

Ms Pulford said on Saturday it was owners’ responsibility to care for their animals, especially as summer temperatures soar.

“Whether you have herds of cattle, a few riding horses or a couple of cats, it is incumbent upon you to look after your animals’ welfare, especially in hot weather by providing plenty of water, feed and shade,” she said.

The state government has made changes to animal welfare laws, allowing officers from Agriculture Victoria, the RSPCA and Victoria Police to issue notices to anyone who commits a cruelty offence.

Previously, inspectors could only issue a notice to an animal’s owner.

Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with finesup to $77,730 or two years’imprisonment.

Premier Daniel Andrews’ office released a press release that explained Victoria Police should be contacted whenever an animal is left inside a hot vehicle.

Police are permitted to break into a vehicle to rescue the suffering animal.

Other hot weather advice to animal owners includes:

Not handlingor transportinglivestock during extreme heat. If this is unavoidable, people should plan ahead to avoid handling or transporting their livestock during the hottest times of day, and must schedule access to water and frequent, shady rest stops.Feeding heat-stressed horseselectrolytes and cooling them downby hosing them with cool wateror placing wet towels over them.Exercisingpets in the cool of the day. Do notwalk dogs on hot paths or roads, either.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Pressure on platypus numbersPhotos, video

DECLINING: The platypus population has seen a continuing steady decline, leading it’s status to be upgraded to “near threatened”. Picture: Piia WirsuDespite being protected, the outlook of the platypus is looking grim,with declining populations and three deaths in Tasmania just this week.
Nanjing Night Net

December saw the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) upgrade the status of the platypusto “near threatened”, noting the steady population decline of the species.

In Tasmania a range of threats are contributing to the droppingplatypus numbers, with habitat destruction, water quality, dogs and feral cats, rubbish andillegal fishingand netting all contributing.

Just this week three platypus carcasses were found in an illegal fishing net in Tasmania’s north-west, where it is believed they became trapped and drowned.

Platypus House operations managerSharon Berryman wants to see the platypus have a higher profile so people are aware of the impact their actions have on the unique species. She thinks it’s all about “education, education”.

“We need to educate children about platypus,” she said.

“Education, understanding and getting people to understand how unique and how different they are.”

Ms Berryman said she has seen some “horror stories”.

“There was a feral cat situation at Exeter where a lady’s cat at night time was going out –[it]eradicated all the female platypus in that area. If you’ve only got a male in that area and you’ve got no females then you’ve got no reproduction,” she said.

Oranother story, wherea female platypus suffocated in her burrow by lining it with plastic she found in the river.

Another major concern to the health of platypus populations in Tasmania is the platypus fungal disease mucormycosis, which was first observed in 1982 and results in open ulcers on platypuses and then death.

It is believed the fungus was introduced to Tasmania via frogs transported from the mainland, but is not known to affect mainland platypuses.

There is little known about the fungal disease, making it difficult to determine the extent of the threat it poses.

Pressure on platypus numbers | Photos, video TweetFacebookMs Berryman would like to see research into the platypus and its threats gain similar traction as that seen in the Save the Tasmanian Devil campaign.

Platypuses have several unique characteristics that distinguish them, most notably they are monotremes –or egg-laying mammals.

The only other monotremes in the world are four species of echidna.

Notoriously shy, the platypus is difficult to breed in captivity. There have been only nine successful recorded breedings worldwide to date.

Ms Berryman said this means there is little backstop if populations docontinue to decline, as captive breeding programs like those implemented to secure the Tasmanian devil repopulation wouldn’t work.

“We’re on the back foot because we would like to understand that whole breeding process so that if something does happen we can fall back on that (captive breeding),” she said.

Additionally, it is believed the platypus only breed every two years, meaning it can take populations a long time to recover after suffering a hit.

“We’re finding that they’re dropping down but we’re not getting them to breed up again ,” Ms Berryman said.

The Platypus House has made breeding their platypuses a priority this summer, with an in-house romance they are hoping will prove fruitful.

“That’s our primary goal,we have a female out with our male and we’re doing everything we can … we’re focusing on what, as a male and a female, they need to do so we’re putting their needs ahead of the business needs,” Ms Berryman said.

“We need to understand that (how they breed in captivity)so that if something does happen to the Tasmanian platypus we’ve got an understanding of how we might be able to help them.”

To learn more about the platypus, and why it’s unique, the Platypus House runs tours every day. Visit 梧桐夜网platypushouse南京夜网419论坛.