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Archives for June2019

Footscray restaurant’s windows smashed twice in one week as residents fear ‘class war’

Sixteen window panels were smashed at 8-Bit over the New Year’s Eve weekend. The burger restaurant has been targeted again. Photo: Jason SouthFootscray burger restaurant 8bit has been targeted by vandals for the second time in a week.
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Over the New Year’s weekend, the burger and shakes venue had its windows smashed. The words “F— off hipster scum” were also scrawled across the front door.

During the early hours of Saturday morning, the Droop Street store was targeted again.

A Victoria Police spokeswoman said the restaurant was targeted by a man and a woman about 2am.

“A number of windows and doors were smashed with a rock,” she said.

“Police quickly responded, however the pair had fled.”

8bit co-owner Shayne McCallum said he believed the same man and woman were responsible for both attacks.

He said six windows including the glass automatic door were damaged in the latest vandalism.

“We’ll just get some roller shutters and hopefully prevent them from doing anymore damage,” Mr McCallum said.

“We just boarded it up and traded as usual today.

“On the flipside, everyone’s really good, like the community’s been really good.

“They’re like texting me or people I don’t even know doing Facebook messenger and saying ‘we visited the area, we love it, we’re coming for lunch just to support’ and ‘hopefully it will pay for the windows’, some other people wrote.”

8bit is not the only relatively new establishment to be targeted in the rapidly gentrifying suburb of Footscray in recent weeks.

A bag of meat was thrown through the front door of Rudimentary cafe last month, while other bars and restaurants have reported vandalism.

Susan Cram, a resident of Melbourne’s inner west for five years, says locals are worried the vandalism represents a “hidden class war”.

“After the AFL grand final last year the community was so together,” she said.

“For this sort of violence to be happening, this discontent to be brewing and manifesting itself after that wonderful time, is a bit scary. Who’s next?”

Anyone with further information about the vandalism is being urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
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Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
苏州美甲培训

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
苏州美甲培训

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

Leave them in cars and pay the price

The state government has reminded people to look after their pets in hot weather. Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with fines up to $77,730 or two years’ imprisonment. Picture: iSTOCKAGRICULTURE Minister Jaala Pulford has reminded petowners that leaving their animals inside hot cars is a criminal offence and could see them imprisoned orfined more than $70,000.
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Ms Pulford said on Saturday it was owners’ responsibility to care for their animals, especially as summer temperatures soar.

“Whether you have herds of cattle, a few riding horses or a couple of cats, it is incumbent upon you to look after your animals’ welfare, especially in hot weather by providing plenty of water, feed and shade,” she said.

The state government has made changes to animal welfare laws, allowing officers from Agriculture Victoria, the RSPCA and Victoria Police to issue notices to anyone who commits a cruelty offence.

Previously, inspectors could only issue a notice to an animal’s owner.

Causing animals to suffer is a criminal offence punishable with finesup to $77,730 or two years’imprisonment.

Premier Daniel Andrews’ office released a press release that explained Victoria Police should be contacted whenever an animal is left inside a hot vehicle.

Police are permitted to break into a vehicle to rescue the suffering animal.

Other hot weather advice to animal owners includes:

Not handlingor transportinglivestock during extreme heat. If this is unavoidable, people should plan ahead to avoid handling or transporting their livestock during the hottest times of day, and must schedule access to water and frequent, shady rest stops.Feeding heat-stressed horseselectrolytes and cooling them downby hosing them with cool wateror placing wet towels over them.Exercisingpets in the cool of the day. Do notwalk dogs on hot paths or roads, either.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.