苏州美甲美睫培训学校

Archives for July2019

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
苏州美甲培训

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus

A bond for life: University of Canberra student Sarah Hazell had her right hand re-attached by Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh in what he believes was the procedure of his career. Photo: Karleen Minney.UNIVERSITY of Canberra student Sarah Hazell was heading home to Moruya for Christmas a year ago when her car veered off the Kings Highway just south of Bungendore and rolled several times.
苏州美甲培训

Her right hand was all-but severed, “hanging on by a tiny tendon”, according to the Canberra Hospital plastic surgeon Ross Farhadieh.

It was December 6. Thoughts of many were turning to Christmas and winding down for the holidays. Mr Farhadieh’s too. He had family in town. That Sunday afternoon he’d told his mum that he expected things to be quiet. They were off to see the latest James Bond movie.

He parked his car. And then his mobile rang with news of Sarah’s accident.

There is an obvious rapport between Canberra plastic surgeon Dr Ross Farhadieh and his young patient Sarah Hazell who today can use her re-attached right hand to write, drive, swim, eat with. Photo: Karleen Minney.

The movie was ditched and Mr Farhadieh was in another theatre altogether by Sunday evening for what turned out to be epic 14-hour surgery in which he painstakingly re-attached Sarah’s hand.

One toilet break. No food. Just hour after hour of focus and concentration that stretched well into Monday morning, as Mr Farhadieh performed what he believes could be the surgery of his life, mending bones, tendons, nerves, arteries, veins.

“It was effectively a hand transplant,” he said.

“I don’t expect to see another one for the remainder of my career.”

Within two weeks of the surgery, Sarah, who is right-handed, was writing Christmas cards with the re-attached hand. A year later, she is back at uni, determined to live her life to the full.

Mr Farhadieh believes the world-standard microsurgery services at the Canberra Hospital saved Sarah’s hand, but so too did her own quiet determination to not give in and to continue with intensive rehabilitation.

“There are some people who are just very good at dealing with adversity,” he said.

“And just because you look at them from the outside and they look very fragile or gentle, it doesn’t mean they don’t have that iron core. And she’s definitely one of those people.”

A year later, 21-year-old Sarah is close to tears as she speaks about what her doctors mean to her.

“Oh, I don’t even have words,” she said. “Just so grateful.”

A series of things worked in Sarah’s favour on the day of the accident, which was likely the result of fatigue. The first was that an off-duty paramedic was among the first on the scene and helped to get her quickly to hospital by the Snowy Hydro SouthCare helicopter.

Four hours is the critical threshold for a severed limb to be without a blood supply before the muscles start to die. So the hand had to be reattached in Canberra. Mr Farhadieh had blood pumping again to the hand a little over four hours after Sarah’s accident.

“It was literally on the cusp so as soon as I saw her hand pink-up, I was like, ‘Yes!’,” he said.

But the drama did not end there.

There was a push from some to have Sarah transferred to Sydney because it was closer and she could go by helicopter.

Mr Farhadieh was adamant she be flown by fixed-wing aircraft to Melbourne to be in the care of Professor Wayne Morrison at St Vincent’s Hospital, the man who led the surgical team that performed Australia’s first hand transplant in 2011.

Not only that, Professor Morrison was a mentor to Mr Farhadieh, having trained him during this medical studies.

It would take longer to transport Sarah to Melbourne, but Mr Farhadieh believed it was worth it.

“Really, you want the most experienced people around you to fix this and the guy who did the hand transplant is the world’s foremost authority, right?” he said.

Sarah was back in surgery in Melbourne by the Monday evening, the day after her accident. Professor Morrison focused on grafting skin and fat from her thigh on to her damaged arm.

There were three operations in Melbourne and within two weeks, Sarah was home in Moruya, recovering with parents Terry and Annette, with the support of siblings Amy and Nathan.

Mr Farhadieh said for all the trauma experienced by Sarah, everything that could go right, did go right.

“Sarah’s outcome has been a spectacular Christmas miracle for all of us,” he said.

“Her sensation and motor function has returned and she has a highly-functional hand again.”

Apart from everything else, her experience is another reminder to be safe on the roads during the holiday season.

On the day of the accident, Sarah had finished her part-time job and was feeling tired. She still believed she was well enough to drive almost three hours to Moruya. Witnesses say her car simply drifted off to the side of the road.

“I thought I was fine,” she said.

“I’d just say to people, ‘Take a break, drive with someone’. Or don’t drive at all if you’re tired.”

She remembers little of the accident other than waking up and being told she was in a hospital in Melbourne. She had no other injuries except a graze on her leg. How the hand was actually cut remains a mystery.

Accepting the injury took some time.

“I don’t think I looked at my arm for a couple of months,” she said.

“You slowly take time. I mean I’ve got a lot of people around me who are great.”

At the time of the accident, Sarah was studying to be a primary school teacher. She has since switched to public health, planning to become perhaps an occupational therapist or psychologist.

The accident played a part in diverting her life path.

“I think I always had a passion [for health] but this probably pushed me more to change and do it,” she said.

Mr Farhadieh, meanwhile, is a migrant who moved to Australia from Iran with his family when he was 13. Among his many achievements is writing a plastic surgery textbooknow studied around the world. He says after “being the beneficiary of the brilliant education in this country”, he wanted to work in the public health system and help people like Sarah.

“If you don’t give back, what’s the point?” he said.

Illawarra Mercury

For good of all, we must eat and buy sustainably

I arrived in Australia in February 2011, fresh faced and ready to explore the land of plenty. I dropped my jaw and backpack when I was asked to pay $9.50 for two bananas. They weren’t international prize-winning bananas, they were just two standard bananas.
苏州美甲培训

Cyclone Yasi had ripped through north Queensland earlier that month, wiping out three-quarters of Australia’s banana crop.

Five years later, avocado eaters tracked the price of the breakfast staple like Wall Street traders as a single fruit reached $7.

These are just two examples of how Mother Earth is putting us back in our place.

We can expect more food price spikes to come as the world warms and heatwaves, bushfires and storms intensify.

Summer barbies will get pricier, as the cost of farmed salmon, beef and wine are predicted to rise.

After a protein fix? Carbon dioxide reduces the protein content of some grains like our daily loaf.

Extreme weather is also shaking up how our food gets from the farm to our plate.

Like crops, highways and railroads are at risk of damage.

During the 2011 Queensland floods, several towns were cut off for up to two weeks, preventing food top ups.

There is generally less than one-month’s supply of non-perishable food and less than five days’ supply of perishable food in the supply chain at any one time – we’re extremely vulnerable.

It’s becoming more difficult to ignore Mother Earth’s warning signs. But we can reason with her.

Supporting our farmers, who work tirelessly to feed us, is a good start.

Eating more plant-based foods, buying the ugly fruit and eating at home more often will also help to make our food supply a sustainable one.

Dr Sinead Boylan is a public health nutritionist at the University of Sydney.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

Nicole Kidman leads Aussie charge at Golden Globes 2017 with 10th nomination

Nicole Kidman, winner of the international star award for Lion, and presenter Dev Patel backstage at the 28th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala on January 2. Both are nominated for Golden Globes for their work in the film. Photo: Jordan Strauss A newly clean shaven Mel Gibson on Jimmy Kimmel Live ahead of the awards. He says winning the best director award for Braveheart was a “big thrill”. Photo: Randy Holmes
苏州美甲培训

Joel Edgerton is a first-time Golden Globe nominee, Mel Gibson is on a comeback tour with a best director nod for the Australian-produced Hacksaw Ridge, and Nicole Kidman has racked up her 10th Golden Globe nomination for the Australian-produced drama Lion.

But what they all share is national pride. “Wow, it’s fantastic,” Gibson says, referring to the three individual nominations as well as nominees for best drama, Hacksaw Ridge (and its lead Andrew Garfield) and Lion (and supporting actor Dev Patel). “Australia is truly a global player in the film world now and it’s exciting to see the Aussies are so well represented.”

Gibson and Kidman have a long history with the Golden Globe awards, given out for the past 74 years by a small group of foreign journalists based in Hollywood and long viewed as an important box to check on the way to the Academy Awards.

Says Kidman, “The first time I went to the Golden Globes, I was nominated for Billy Bathgate [1991 drama starring Dustin Hoffman] and I couldn’t believe anyone even knew who I was, so to get nominated was just stunning to me.” Times have changed for the movie star, whose date that year was her new husband, Tom Cruise. Tomorrow she’ll be bringing her Aussie husband of 10 years, Keith Urban, and host Jimmy Fallon has asked her to participate in the show’s pre-taped opening skit alongside Ryan Reynolds, Justin Timberlake and Tina Fey. “The Golden Globes is already the most fun awards show of them all and Jimmy will really tap into that vibe,” she says.

Gibson vaguely remembers appearing as a presenter on the Golden Globes “when I was a young actor 30 or 40 years ago” but will never forget the “big thrill” he felt on  winning his 1995 best director Golden Globe for Braveheart. “It’s always a good excuse to sit down, eat a rubber chicken and have a rubberneck at all the other famous people around,” he says. “You get to meet people you’ve admired for a long time. Last time I met Sly and Clint Eastwood so it’s kind of a cool, fun thing to do.” He was also famously skewered by past host Ricky Gervais on two memorable occasions but is confident he’s safe this year. “I’ve been told Jimmy is pretty harmless,” Gibson says. “I remember after the last experience with Ricky, I wanted to strangle him. I saw him later and he said, ‘We were great’ and I said, ‘Yeah right, now move on!'”

Edgerton has no idea what to expect as the new kid on the carpet, adding, “I’ve never been before but it feels exciting to be recognised in this category because they are all actors I admire greatly.”

If the three Aussies continue making the rounds during the long awards season leading up to the Oscars on February 26, they will be spending a lot of time together. Kidman says, “I think any time you are nominated with fellow Australians and you start to see them all the time at these things, you feel like you get closer and closer.”

Gibson is also looking forward to some bonding. “I know Joel, I’ve hung out with him a little bit but I’ve known Nic only peripherally and said hello to her one time so it’ll be fun if we share a few more bad meals together!”

Fairfax Media’s Golden Globes blog is live from Monday at 11am.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

Mickey Edwards, the unknown cult hero of the SCG

Third Test, as it happened and scorecard
苏州美甲培训

Australian sports fans may have found their newest cult hero after a little known fast bowler from Manly-Warringah Cricket Club came onto the field at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the third Test against Pakistan on Saturday afternoon.

The Channel Nine commentary team were struggling to work out who the substitute fielder was as he was greeted with a rousing reaction from the crowd when fielding his first ball.

Mickey Edwards was a sight to see at 198cm with flowing gold locks leaking under his baggy green – a sight not lost on a day five crowd looking for some fun.

It was a fielding stint to remember for the fringe Sydney Sixers bowler, who received a standing ovation before the same crowd booed his replacement – an unusual experience, no doubt, for number one bat David Warner. Meanwhile, what about the reception for sub fielder Mickey Edwards! Get around him! #AUSvPAKpic.twitter苏州美甲培训/zVC9aKZ876— cricket苏州美甲培训419论坛 (@CricketAus) January 7, 2017

The local was soon trending on Twitter as his photo, the crowd reaction and calls for his return to the field were all widely shared, while his home club celebrated the 22-year-old’s new found fame.

The excitement represented a seating upgrade from his spot at the Boxing Day Test last week, and a change in outfit too. SCG fans absolutely loving the work from Mickey Edwards in the field here #AUSvPAKpic.twitter苏州美甲培训/avH52qRdE5— cricket苏州美甲培训419论坛 (@CricketAus) January 7, 2017The wiggles do Boxing Day #ohwhatafeelingpic.twitter苏州美甲培训/JgYlrcWLU2— Mickey Edwards (@mickey_edwards) December 26, 2016Away from Twitter for 15mins & all hell breaks loose. Our boy @mickey_edwards releasing all kinds of love as @CricketAus subfielder pic.twitter苏州美甲培训/vL9BCSOo5D— Manly Cricket (@MWDCC) January 7, 2017This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.